Culture

Learning in the moment – what is it and how to do it?

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10235The other day I was watching the Matrix, an epic sci-fi trilogy that depicts a dystopian future, in which the perceived reality is a computer-generated simulation. In the second part of the trilogy, during a very intense car chase, Trintiy, one of the main characters, finds herself in a situation in which she has to learn how to start a motorbike without having the keys. She was under pressure, and she needed to master the new skill very quickly. What happens next is Trinity calls the ‘Operator’ to ask for a ‘download.’ As her mind is connected to the matrix, the Operator is able to download and install the new skill, just like you would install a new app on your phone. This was the moment when I realised that sometimes, day-to-day work can be very similar: we find ourselves in a challenging environment that requires us to learn in the moment.

The ever-changing world of work and increasing longevity means that we need to learn continuously throughout our career so we can stay productive and relevant for a longer period of time. At the same time, the knowledge and skills we pick up in the education system becomes outdated very rapidly, therefore an unorthodox approach to learning becomes necessary.

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Here are three things you and your organisation can do to enable rapid re-skilling:

  • Create a learning culture that focuses on ‘pull’ learning: While traditional L&D focused on push learning, making these decisions for the learner, pull learning allows individuals to identify and meet their own development needs in the moment. The Operator did not make Trinity learn the new skill, she asked for it when she needed it.
  • Shift the role of L&D from broker to enabler: the role of L&D needs to shift from acting as a broker between employees and learning to becoming more of an enabler of learning. This is the Operator’s role in the scene – to make sure people are enabled.
  • Be proactive as an employee: Ask yourself what skill set you will need over the next 10 years and if you identify a gap, be proactive in addressing it. After every mission in the Matrix, Trinity assesses herself to identify her own areas to develop, so she can work out what skills she needs to master in the future.

To stay ahead in the future of work, we – like Trinity – will need to embrace learning new skills in the moment; and organisations will need to create environments that enable this.

The story of Jack the bored banker: The big secret to employee engagement

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The Bored BankerGuest blog by Siobhan McHale, CHRO at Dulux Group

“Anne Lewis” mulled over a problem she was having with a staff member as she queued for her morning coffee at the city’s popular Hole In The Wall Café. She was the executive in charge of a retail loans department at “BlueStoneBank (BSB)” and she had an issue with one of the employees in her team. Jack had been working at the bank for 6 years but had seemed quite disengaged recently. He was bright and others in the team liked working with him but he had been in the same position for over 3 years now. He seemed stuck in a rut. Indeed, over the past few months she noticed that Jack had been so leisurely in his ways that others in the team had to wade in to help him get through his workload.

Anne was meeting with her boss Lee later that afternoon and she knew he would be demanding more from her team. The recent performance stats were not looking good and she needed everyone in the Department, including Jack, to pull their weight. If they didn’t all lift their game Lee would start micromanaging her again!

The Chevy Corvette Sting Ray

As Anne stood in line she wondered whether Jack was simply bored with work or just disinterested in life in general. She remembered a recent work social event when he had spoken animatedly about his passion for antique cars. He seemed to spend every waking hour, when he wasn’t at work, tinkering with that Chevy Corvette Sting Ray sitting in his garage. She wished Jack had the same level of enthusiasm for his job as he had for his beloved collectible car.

Chevy Corvette StingrayJack seemed much more engaged in working on his Chevy Corvette Sting Ray than he was in his role at BSB

Anne’s mind went back again to the meeting with her boss Lee later that afternoon. She knew that her Department was coming under scrutiny and Jack’s recent listless manner wasn’t helping one bit! She wondered if she should take a different approach to unleashing some of his discretionary effort at work.

The coffee catch-up

Anne ordered her usual cappuccino and decided to get Jack a latte which was his favourite morning brew. Five minutes later she bounded into his office and, as she handed him his coffee, she asked “Jack how do you see your role, you know your job here at BBS?” He took a long sip of the latte, leaned back in his chair and responded “Hey, thanks for the coffee! Well my role, as I see it, is to help our customers complete their loan applications and then submit them to the Risk department for approval. As you know it’s all about driving the revenue line I suppose.”

Anne enquired “What loans do you have on your ‘to do’ list for today?” Jack stretched his arms out above his head and responded “One couple, the Mendozas, want to try and buy their first home in a cool suburb near the bay. Another loan is for a recent graduate Sofia who has just gotten her driving license and wants to purchase her first car. The last high priority one for today is for this guy Liam who is a fanatical sailor and wants to buy a boat so that he can try his hand at fulfilling his dream of sailing around the world!”

“That’s a pretty interesting and diverse group” Anne responded. “And it seems to me from those stories that you’re actually helping to make these peoples’ dreams come true in your role, eh?’ Jack looked at her over the rim of his coffee cup. He raised his eyebrow and nodded slowly. “Yes I suppose you could say that.”

Over the next few week Anne noticed a spring in Jack’s step. He was getting to work on time, she was finding fewer mistakes in his applications and he just seemed, well, happier. He was also a lot more productive and even made time to help out others in the Department. All of this had led to an increase in the team’s productivity which has not gone un-noticed by the boss Lee, who was once again singing Anne’s praises.

The power of reframing

When I caught up with Anne at The Hole In The Wall Café later that month she talked about the shift in Jack’s attitude. “What’s changed to create a happier and more engaged employee? I asked. Anne explained the work that she had been doing over the past few months to reframe the role of her team and to connect them more closely to the difference their work was making in the lives of customers. She went on to say “I reframed Jack’s role from ‘form filler’ to ‘dream maker’ and that, I believe, has made all the difference.”

ReframedReframing verb (transitive) 1. to support or enclose (a picture, photograph, etc) in a new or different frame. 2. to change the plans or basic details of (a policy, idea, etc)

Reframing is about looking at the world through a different lens and is a powerful way to transform our thinking by giving a different meaning to our experience. Reframing the role of employees can lead to higher levels of engagement especially if connected to the difference that your company makes in the lives of others.

Reflection

How are your employees framing their role at work? Is there an opportunity to reframe how they see the part they are playing in meeting the needs of customers?

Dream MakerJack had reframed his role from ‘form filler’ to ‘dream maker’ and that had made all the difference


Thank you for reading my post. I’m passionate about creating better workplaces and regularly write about culture and change. If you would like to read future articles please ‘follow or send me a LinkedIn invite. Want to read more?

How to win friends and influencers  

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SONY DSCThere has been a fundamental disruption of influence and power over the past few years. Historically, power and influence were in the hands of a chosen few at the top of hierarchies such as politicians, CEOs and public figures. Today we see a different picture. A great example of this is the meteoric rise of Vloggers. These are often teenagers, posting videos from their homes somewhere quite remote. They can command viewers in the their millions and make – or break – a brand or product purely through the influence of a 50 second video. Just last week celebrity influencer Kylie Jenner appears to have wiped roughly $1.5 billion off the market value of Snapchat with one tweet.

The interesting point for organisations to take away is that this isn’t just happening in the outside world. It’s happening at work too. Enterprise social networks such as Yammer or Chatter, as well as a tendency towards flatter hierarchies in many organisations, means that your influencers aren’t necessary all sitting in the executive team. At work, influencers are ‘people who can, because of their knowledge, skills and position in the company network, and not their formal hierarchical power, shape the views of multiple colleagues’[1]. These influencers can become powerful change agents, most particularly in the face of culture change or a major transition your organisation is undertaking.

A challenge for organisations is to identify these influencers, and ensure they can leverage them to support organisational needs and outcomes. While I find that most of the organisations I speak with are aware this should be on their to do list, I sense that many are struggling to find a route to achieving it. So I’ve drawn out three ways to illustrate how to identify influencers, focus on them to nudge behaviour and leverage them to change micro-behaviours.

  1. Identify influencers: Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), a long-standing client of ours, has made public communication the default through an internal social networking platform the norm called Knome. By using Knome in place of email, a private form communication they aim to unleash unstructured collaboration, innovation and creativity. Interestingly, TCS have also used this tool to identify influencers within their organisation. By using a platform, they can see beyond the traditional hierarchy and identify those with social capital or bright ideas, wherever they might sit within the organisation
  2. Focus on influencers to nudge behaviour: Nudge theory is a concept in behavioural science where positive reinforcements and indirect suggestions influence the motives, incentives and decision making of groups and individuals[2]. As you can imagine, if organisations focus on changing the behaviours of influencers and leaders, these nudges become all the more powerful. This is due to the multiplier effect of highly visible or influential people on their peers
  3. Leverage influencers to change micro-behaviours: Enabling workplace culture change requires an understanding and altering of micro-behaviours. It is important for influencers and leaders to call out negative micro-behaviours in the workplace. Equally, leaders and influencers should provide micro-affirmations, that is congratulating the efforts and achievements of employees when they engage in the right kind of work or behaviours. In doing so, employees’ behaviour becomes conditioned through negative repercussions and positive reinforcements, provided by both leaders and influencers

Identifying and leveraging influencers requires subtle and thoughtful work, but research indicates that the outcomes can be significant, particularly in the context of culture change. I have certainly seen the results in the crowdsourcing projects that I run with clients – both in engaging influencers to raise awareness and engagement before the event, and in identifying hidden influencers during crowdsourcing events themselves.

If you’d like to find out more about how to identify and leverage influencers in your organisation, feel free to contact me on harriet@hotspotsmovement.com

[1] Shu, L. Gino, F. Bazerman, M H., (2011) Ethical Discrepancy : Changing Our Attitudes to Resolve Moral Dissonance, Behavioral Business Ethics: Ideas on an Emerging Field. Taylor and Francis Publishing

[2] Workwire, (2015) Workplace Nudging Persuade People To Desirable Behaviour

Unlocking Performance

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haniahWhat incites people to deliver their best performance? I have been exploring this question for some years now and I am increasingly of the view that the answer lies in empowering people. People will be most committed and motivated to the organisation when they feel their day-to-day work environment is autonomous. They need to believe they have a sense of control over their work or they may adopt what psychologist Martin Seligman at the University of Pennsylvania termed ‘learned helplessness’, where they basically stop taking initiative.[1]

Building a culture of trust is what will truly make a significant difference. Research indicates that people in high-trust organisations are more productive, have more energy at work, suffer less chronic stress and stay with their employers longer than people working at low-trust companies. Simply put, when companies trust people to choose which projects they will work on, they focus on what they care about most and this powers greater performance.[2]

An important caveat to remember here is that autonomy is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it can fuel creativity and performance. On the other, autonomy can also lead to ambiguity and chaos. This is because the effects of empowering people are largely impacted by how people perceive their leader’s behaviour. People may perceive greater autonomy as an indication that the leader trusts them and is providing them with opportunities for growth or they may see empowerment as evidence that the leader can’t lead and is trying to avoid making difficult decisions. In the latter example, people may become frustrated about their role, leading to worse performance. It is therefore vital that when trying to empower people, the leader makes sure people are equipped effectively to perform their jobs. To make this happen, an ongoing discussion of the needs, obstacles, what is working and what is not working is of paramount importance to the development and upkeep of an autonomous working environment. Indeed, providing people real autonomy requires hard work of crafting all the incentives, practices and processes that actually empower employees to be autonomous. A good practice illustrating how to approach autonomy is the Swedish company Spotify as they have largely succeeded in maintaining an agile and autonomous mindset without sacrificing accountability.[3]

Please send any ideas or examples you have on building an environment that empowers people. I would love to hear them!

 

[1] Monarth, H. (2014). Make your team feel powerful. Harvard Business Review

[2] Zak, P. (2017). The Neuroscience of trust. Harvard Business Review

[3] Mankins, M. & Garton, E. (2017). How Spotify balances autonomy and accountability. Harvard Business Review

How to unlock agile working in your organisation… and five pitfalls to avoid

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Here at Hot Spots Movement, we have supported many leading organisations in realising their ambitions around agile working. This experience has revealed to us what it takes to successfully roll out an agile working approach in big, established companies – and crucially – the pitfalls to avoid. Here are five questions you need to ask yourself in order to unleash agility in your organisation:

  1. Are you clear about why you’re embarking on agile working?

Agile working not as an end in itself, however, many companies fall into the trap of addressing it as if it is a separate initiative on the to-do list. Instead, for agile working to really take hold it must be viewed as an enabler of individual, team and organisational outcomes important to your company. What is it about agile working that will enable you to deliver on your business or talent strategy?

  1. Where are you on the journey?

Like any culture shift, agile working takes time. Every organisation is at a different level of maturity when it comes to bringing about this agility – for some, it’s facilitating the next level of coordination between team members on different working contracts, in different locations, combining under one purpose; for others, it’s about getting acceptance of the idea of working from home once in a while. Both are valid and important milestones, and it’s critical that organisations appreciate where they are on the journey and avoid the temptation to run too fast.

  1. Who’s leading the way?

A common challenge for organisations embarking on agile working is converting the intellectual understanding of why this approach is required, with the practical commitment to make it happen in teams and divisions throughout the organisation. Our experience is that this challenge tends to manifest at senior leadership levels, with sentiments such as ‘I agree we need agile working, but not for my team – it wouldn’t work for us.’ It’s essential that leaders are presented with the case for agile working as an enabler of the business strategy (See point 1) and are tasked with being part of the solution as to how it will work within their team.

  1. How will you take everyone along with you?

Agile working is a journey that everyone in the organisation must be on together. While it is critical that leaders appreciate and act on their role in endorsing agile working, the success or failure will ultimately rest on the everyday behaviours and interactions of colleagues and team members. Everyone must appreciate their role not only in taking up flexible working themselves, but in enabling their colleagues to do the same. The emphasis on each person’s role in enabling agile working shifts the conversation away from the individual, instead focusing it on the team dynamic. Doing so alleviates from the very beginning some of the concerns from leaders and managers about negative impacts on collaboration and team performance.

  1. How will you tap into what really drives behaviour in your organisation?

A common barrier to agile working is the belief that it will negatively impact one’s career progression, being viewed as a sing of less than 100% commitment to the organisation and its clients. To overcome this, agile working must be positioned as a capability required of high performers who want to progress in the organisation. Those on high potential programmes or Partner tracks must be evaluated in part on their ability to work in an agile way themselves, and enable high performing agile teams. Creating this link is essential in shifting the perception of agile working away from isolated initiatives for specific groups of employees, and towards a future-proofed way of working to unleash performance.

With employees increasingly impatient for new and agile ways of working, perhaps it’s time to ask (and answer) the questions that will move your organisation forward on the journey.

Find out more about our work in this area by contacting:

E: emma@hotspotsmovement.com | T: +44 (0) 20 7759 1848

The Unintended Consequences of a Strong Culture

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Hannah Blog HeadshotWith our Shifting Cultures Masterclass around the corner, I’ve been doing some thinking about culture – specifically, the elusive concept of a ‘strong culture’.

Crafting a strong culture can be interpreted as forming a shared social identity, or a culture in which individuals identify highly with one another and the organisation as a whole. There are benefits to this approach; high-identifying employees demonstrate greater abilities in coping with stress, resilience, and performance. Equally, there are also pitfalls – highly-identifying teams can become more susceptible to stress and burnout due to pressure to constantly perform and fear of letting the team down. So, the pursuit of a strong culture is not as straight-forward as it may appear; in fact, there are three major unintended consequences that may emerge in the strongest of cultures:

  1. Strong cultures hire for culture fit. This focus, though seemingly advantageous, can make it difficult to hire individuals who are different from the prevailing culture, despite their potential as a counterbalancing asset. While personality and culture fit are important, considering them as deciding factors in the recruitment process significantly limits diversity of thought. We then enter the trap of like-minded hiring like-minded, while those that may offer a unique value-adding perspective are neglected or snatched up by competitors.
  2. In strong cultures, the strongest voices are heard. This is a problem because there is the potential for a significant group to be silenced. Even in cases of fairly homogenised cultures, employees are still subject to familiarity blindness – it is difficult for those immersed within a culture to see a culture. Every employee sees the world through their own biased cultural filters. This can turn dangerous when employees are immersed in and blinded to potentially toxic environments, as there is no way to challenge normative behaviours.
  3. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, strong cultures are change resistant. Strength implies stability, and as such, is not welcoming to subcultures. An emergent theme in our research is that subcultures are healthy – even essential – players in helping the organisation stay agile. This is because they encourage creative thinking and constructive controversy in regard to how the organisation should interact both internally and with the environment. Moreover, subcultures serve as the spawning grounds for emerging values, keeping the organisation aligned with the needs of customers, society and other stakeholders.

With all this in mind, rather than constantly strengthening and reinforcing culture, I propose that we should be focused on creating a dynamic culture instead.

The key tenets of a dynamic culture include nurturing diverse perspectives, and providing channels for employee voices to be heard. This is not to say that you should throw your values out the window. It’s important to unite your employees under a set of core values – values that are central the organisation’s functioning – in order to reap the benefits of a shared social identity. However, it’s just as important to ensure that these are distinguished from peripheral values – traits that are desirable but not essential to organisation. It is here on the periphery where agility and innovation thrive, allowing people to simultaneously embrace and constructively challenge the dominant culture.

So, if you’re looking to craft a strong culture, you may be better off considering instead how to cultivate a dynamic one. Dynamic cultures adapt to uncertainty and continuous change, fostering diversity of thought and perspective with plenty of room for questioning the norm.

Stay tuned for our upcoming Masterclass, The Agile People Strategy, on 2nd October 2018. For more information, contact hannah@hotspotsmovement.com.

How can organisations realise the promise of diversity?

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“If you work hard you will succeed. If you really want to achieve your dreams, it’s in your hands.”

annaWe are all familiar with variations on these thoughts, and the idea that individualism and hard work will win out in the end is a truism that many people take on faith. Organisations often construct their recruitment processes with the idea that society is meritocratic – believing that those high-potential hires have succeeded due to their work ethic and skills alone.

Despite this, research has shown that it is often those from affluent backgrounds who land the best jobs. Even when people from disadvantaged backgrounds manage to break into a professional career, they face an earnings penalty compared to colleagues who come from better-off backgrounds.[i] Despite having the same education attainment, role and experience as their more privileged colleagues, those from poorer backgrounds are paid an average of £2,242 (seven per cent) less.[ii] Women and ethnic minorities face a ‘double’ disadvantage in earnings. Those from poorer backgrounds in some cases also exclude themselves from promotion for fear of not ‘fitting in’ and were less likely to ask for pay rises. This is a challenge that organisations are increasingly waking up to. Competition for talent and the need for diversity of thought mean that organisations will lose out commercially if they do not have a cross-section of employees that reflect wider society.

So how can companies improve their diversity and foster inclusiveness around social mobility? Here are three insights from our research:

  • Look for unintended biases in the recruitment process – Could your recruitment approach be filtering out applicants from less advantaged backgrounds? Some organisations, such as EY, are experimenting with relaxing their hiring criteria, or implementing ‘blind’ CVs in recruitment, so that details on university or education are hidden.[iii] Advances in predicative talent analytics may also enable organisations to identify promising talent from a larger pool than they might traditionally consider, basing hiring on data rather than intuition.[iv]
  • Sense-check the gap between the rhetoric and reality – Organisations may think they have the practices and processes in place to increase their social diversity, but if people at all levels of the organisation are unware of them, or don’t use them, there will be no shift in culture or behaviour.
  • Identify a priority area and experiment – Companies often think that moving the needle on diversity means making large-scale changes across several areas. Our research and work on our own I&D Framework has shown that a tailored and focused approach is often more effective. Start by identifying what your organisation does well, and where it is weaker. Selecting key areas allows companies to monitor and measure new interventions to understand the real impact and the changes that take place.

Keeping these insights in mind will help ensure your organisation builds a diverse, inclusive culture.

Interested in creating an I&D strategy that is ready to enable action within your organisation and truly shift the needle on I&D read our complimentary Insights Report on Inclusion and Diversity here: http://bit.ly/IandD-MovingTheNeedle

Or for more information about our I&D research, contact me at anna@hotspotsmovement.com or on 02077591852

[i] Rivera, L. (2015). Pedigree: How Elite Students Get Elite Jobs. Princeton University Press

[ii] Friedman, S., Laurison, D., and Macmillan, L. (2017). Social Mobility, The Class Pay Gap and Intergenerational Worklessness: New Insights From The Labour Force Survey.

[iii] EY drives social mobility by removing academic entry criteria http://www.ey.com/uk/en/newsroom/news-releases/17-02-02-ey-drives-social-mobility-by-removing-academic-entry-criteria

[iv] (2017) FoW Report on Shifting Identities