Thinking About Thought Diversity

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naderBy Nader Sleiman, Analyst

As our awareness of diverse identities and shifting cultural perspectives has grown, so has the expectation that organisations will adopt inclusive measures to ensure that this diversity is represented and empowered at all levels. Gender diversity, for instance, has developed into the inclusion of non-binary and trans individuals through such measures as training to reduce inherent biases in interviews, particularly unconscious gender and racial biases. Similarly, when addressing minority representation, the Equal Opportunity Act provided a framework for inclusive recruitment, such as removing pictures from CVs and accounting for diversity in selection. However, one form of diversity that has, so far, been side-lined is thought diversity.

What is thought diversity?

Natural differences in abilities are somewhat reflected in skills and competencies, but there is more to human beings than just what they know and what they can do. Thought diversity is all about how people think and work. Differences in work pace, development needs, feedback approaches, and rhythm of work all fall under thought diversity. Neurodiversity, which refers to the different ways the brain processes and interprets information, also falls within this area. Recognising thought diversity means accepting that every individual has their own approach to work because of who they are. It means allowing unique contributions from those who possess different points of view, which encourages people to understand and react to information in a fresh light.

How can we be more inclusive?

Without a talent vision that encompasses people’s differences, recruitment biases could hinder the attraction and selection of desired talent. Even internally, such talent could face opportunity limitations that would challenge their career growth. Because of their unique approach to work, employees who bring thought diversity could be perceived as a hindrance to organisational operations rather than added-value perspectives and working styles. Addressing these issues, therefore, is at the core of creating an inclusive environment that accommodates for the needs of this niche diversity group. Simple alterations can go far in this aim. What follows is a far from holistic list of possible suggestions, but it does provide initial steps to consider when aiming to recruit, select and develop thought-diverse-talent.

  1. Recruiting diversity: By understanding thought diversity and its significance, a diversity goal can be set with measurable KPIs. First, including thought diversity means that recruitment should involve a renewed focus on transferable skills. Your ideal candidate may come from a different industry and company size but possess the skills you need to get the job done. Such candidates can offer insights that you would not receive from someone who has worked in the same industry, company, and environment as your organisation. It is key to ask: ‘Does the candidate’s experience grant them the skills needed for the job?’

 

  1. Selecting thought diversity: The past decade has witnessed a monumental growth in how technology helps organisations attract talent. Artificial Intelligence (AI) has offered skill-based assessments that cross-compare profiles to roles based on identified skills. Gaming and virtual reality (VR) have provided industry giants with an unexpected recruitment tool that allows employers to gain additional insights into how candidates respond in different environments. However, organisations are not expected to spend a fortune on advanced technology to find the best fit for your roles; instead, organisations can focus on building a signature selection technique that is unique to their needs, values, and diversity goals. Using the thought diversity goal as a stepping stone, organisations can build their selection technique based on how they define their diversity needs and how far they are willing to invest in and recruit diversity candidates.

 

  1. Personalised Growth: The key to retaining thought-diverse individuals is not providing specific employees with privileges that others cannot enjoy; the key is providing a ‘menu’ of options for everyone to choose from. Flexible working arrangements, part-time work, job sharing, contractual and periodical work could all fall under the umbrella of such measures. From those measures, employees can build their own customised work and learning experience. Therefore, continuous learning can be achieved by engaging employees in deciding how they end up doing their jobs. It enables them to make individual development decisions and control their pace of work in ways that they would be unable to, otherwise. In that sense, organisations need to nurture those diverse candidates by providing this form of autonomy to co-create the culture and optimise the value that they bring. With the right leadership, the right policies, and the right people, organisations can harness the power of diversity in all its forms.

If you wish to learn more about how diversity and inclusion can be introduced into your talent strategy, please reach out to me. Your thoughts are always appreciated, so leave me a comment and let me know what you would like to see at your own organisation regarding thought diversity.

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