The ‘Extra-Human’ Competitive Edge

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naderIn the age of artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), analytics and robotics, it has become difficult to imagine the world prior to our current technology, and even more difficult to foresee what the future will bring. Perhaps the most daunting image of all is humanoids – robots that use AI to learn from human behaviour, mimic it, and even use it to react and innovate through ML. In fact, the future of technology’s intervention in the workplace is closer than one would assume. Sophia, a humanoid who can express feelings and compose facial expressions, was the first robot to become a citizen by order of the United Nations and to be granted citizenship by a country – Saudi Arabia.[1] The notion of a robot workforce, therefore, is not far from possible.

Where does the human workforce fit in at a time of AI- and robotics-dominance?

There are a couple of points to keep in mind when it comes to automation, though. The term automation does not merely refer to robots taking people’s jobs. The term entails all the aforementioned technologies that have become available for integration in present and future workplaces. Consequently, what would normally be considered mundane tasks will be assigned to machines as the human workforce shifts to tasks that rely more on the human element. The part organisations can play in this world, a world of machines and automation, therefore, will be to empower their workforce with the tools and job design that eases this skill transition. Hot Spots Movement’s research on automation presents insights into how organisations can prepare for a seamless transition into this new world. It also introduces organisations to the kind of training needed to empower workers in a manner that improves their chances of thriving in an automated environment. Therefore, aside from the aforementioned soft skills, technical skills can and will be attained, but that will require the human skills of perseverance and dedication.

Hot Spots Movement’s reports on digital transformation and shifting cultures delve deeper into the world of work as innovative technology becomes an inescapable part of how the workplace operates. The world is heading to a point where the niche skill of the human workforce will be our ability to be human. The skills that make us human, particularly skills such as emotional intelligence, empathy, listening, and judgment, will play a key role in giving us a competitive advantage. These skills, the key ingredients in defining our interpersonal skills as human beings, will be our most employable asset. This development means a shift in the mindset governing our perception of how human beings contribute to the workforce. It entails upskilling and reskilling. Employers will have to rethink their training strategies to incorporate automation, diversify learning opportunities for knowledge employees and lower-skilled workers, and guarantee a learning curve that allows all workers to attain their goals in alignment with the goals of the organisation as a whole. Employees, on the other hand, will have to leverage the skills that make them human; they will have to be, in some sense, ultra-human. Thus, the true competitive advantage of the human workforce will be in utilising as much of those capacities that differentiate human beings from machines as possible.

A note of caution

People will need to ask the right people for assistance in making these transitions and empowering the workforce where needed. The Netflix fans out there may remember the ‘Love, Death and Robots’ episode, ‘When the Yoghurt Took Over’. To those of you who don’t, the animated episode witnesses a genetically enhanced yoghurt discovering the solutions to all the problems in our world. In a meeting with a world leader, the yoghurt offers solutions which would eradicate all economic burdens in a year if followed precisely and bring chaos if they’re not. Unsurprisingly, the world leaders’ closeness to the problem leads to their failure in following the yoghurt’s formula, which brings the world to chaos. Similarly, change, when introduced from within, could struggle with the inherent biases that limit an organisation’s capacity to effectively move forward with the change. In those cases, all those organisations need, really, is their own yoghurt.

If reading this has given you some thought on how your organisation could – or should – be preparing for the world of work, Hot Spots Movement could be the “yoghurt” you’re looking for. Drop me an email at nader@hotspotsmovement.com if you’re interested in discussing how you can adapt digital developments to your people strategy in support of your corporate identity.


[1] Dang, Sanjit Singh (Feb 25, 2019). Artificial Intelligence in Humanoid Robots. Forbes.

[2] Gratton, Lynda (Fall 2019). Pioneering Approaches to Re-skilling and Upskilling. MIT Sloan Management Review, Fall 2019 Edition

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