Climate crisis protests and your business

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TomMillions of men, women, and children took part in climate crisis protests in September this year. While much attention has been given to the rallying cry of Greta Thunberg, a young Swedish environmental activist, many companies would do better to focus their attention closer to home. Workers are increasingly demanding a commitment from their employers on social issues such as climate change, and those without a well-defined narrative for their future are set to suffer.

Amazon saw thousands of employees walk out to protest their company’s failure to tackle the climate crisis, despite their CEO Jeff Bezos announcing beforehand that the company is on course to be carbon neutral by 2040, and is aiming to be carbon neutral for 50% of their shipments by 2030. Workers from Facebook, Twitter, and Google left their offices and demanded more of their employers. They urged severance of business ties with oil and gas companies, reducing emissions to zero by 2030, and commitments to climate refugees, a term for people who are forced to leave their home region due to sudden or long-term changes to their local environment.

It is no coincidence that tech companies known for their high-performing workforces have some of the most vocal employees on climate issues.

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Job site Indeed found that high performers are 46% more likely than average performers to be attracted to a new job by a company’s purpose [1]. Social purpose is a key component of this, and has resulted in previous Google walkouts over US military contracts [2]. Modern workers are overwhelmingly likely to consider an employer’s corporate social values; they want to work for company’s that uphold their social values so that they can be proud of their work and feel it has a purpose. In Deloitte’s 2019 Global Millennial survey [3], the climate was ranked as the most concerning challenge facing society; 29% cited it as a worry, a whole 7% more than the next most concerning item, income inequality. A proactive environmental policy is thus a must for companies hoping to attract top talent.

Further, it is well established that people who believe their job has a broader purpose are more likely to work harder, take on challenging or unpopular tasks, and collaborate effectively [4].

A well-defined narrative on climate change, as well as other social issues such as automation, flexible working, and lengthening working lives, is thus crucial for businesses. Successfully doing this will attract and retain talent in an increasingly competitive labour market, where there are even shortages in blue-collar roles [5].

The Google worker’s climate petition said, “As individuals, we may feel alone in facing climate change, but if we act together – if we act now – we can build a better future.” If you are interested in finding out more about how you can build a better future for your company and its workers, I’d love to hear from you at tom@hotspotsmovement.com

 

[1] Indeed, 2016 Talent Attraction Study: How Top Performers Search for Jobs (2016)

[2] ‘Google Should Not Be In Business of War, Say Employees’, BBC News (2018), https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-43656378

[3] The Deloitte Global Millenial Survey 2019 – https://www2.deloitte.com/global/en/pages/about-deloitte/articles/millennialsurvey.html

[4] Dan Cable and Freek Vermeulen, ‘Making work meaningful: A leader’s guide’ McKinsey Quarterly (October 2018)

[5] ‘Feeling blue about the future? Blue-collar labour shortages in the USA and beyond’, Tom Goulding (2019), https://medium.com/swlh/feeling-blue-about-the-future-8a1f79e2fbea

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