Month: November 2013

Outsourcing gets complex

Posted on Updated on


KyleBy Kyle Packer, Head of Online Engagement, The Hot Spots Movement

An amusing story doing the rounds this week concerns the singer R Kelly who has found himself having to deny claims that he outsourced a personal appearance in Louisiana to an impersonator, leaving thousands of fans up in arms.

This might be an extreme anecdote, but it does highlight the still-relevant question of which tasks are appropriate to outsource. While most might agree that performances and personal appearances are probably best not outsourced, there are a whole range of other ‘personal’ tasks which fall into this area of debate. An acquaintance of mine regularly makes money by picking up the slack for tired, sick or – in one or two cases – nonexistent bloggers and yet another celebrity, actor Danny Dyer has recently complained about being vehemently criticised for misogynistic content in a column he claims he never wrote. These tasks tend to be grey areas – many people and organisations outsource them – but the flip side is that as soon as audiences discover what they see as a deception, they feel cheated.

In a more corporate context, we’ve been reading about an employee who outsourced his coding job in China, paying them 20% of his salary for work which exceeded his employer’s expectations. When discovered, however, he was dismissed for breach of contract. The likes of commentator Tim Ferris would describe this individual as pioneering a great new way of working, but ultimately his bosses felt duped. Again, it’s an interesting grey area and, alongside the issue of what to outsource, raises the question of who should do the outsourcing.

These questions are just another example of the complexity engendered by our increasingly connected world where technology and connectivity are rapidly outstripping our ability to change the way we think about ways of working. The good news is that where technology goes, attitudes are bound to follow. So who knows, by 2030, outsourced concerts might be all the rage.

Highlights from the Thinkers 50 Awards

Posted on Updated on

Emma

by Emma Birchall, Head of Research, Future of Work

The Hot Spots Team was at the Thinkers 50 Event earlier this week, where Professor Lynda Gratton was ranked #14 on the list of top management thinkers.

Lynda also participated in a panel debate at the event alongside Amy Edmondson of Harvard Business School, author Tammy Erickson and Stew Friedman from Wharton School of Business. During the debate, Lynda highlighted the fact that although longer life expectancy is one of the most important issues organisations will face in future, few are preparing for it:

“Longevity will be one of the most important issues we face. It will affect everyone and organisations are extremely ill-prepared.”

The event also included an awards ceremony where award-winner Clayton Christensen delivered a moving acceptance speech in which he reminded business professionals and academics alike of the value of time for balance and reflection in our working lives and the unrivalled importance of deep and meaningful relationships with family and friends to provide the support for creativity and success in our careers.

Comment on Collaboration

Posted on

Emma

by Emma Birchall, Head of Research, Future of Work

Our theme for October was Collaboration, so we asked our newsletter readers to share some of their thoughts and experiences around that topic. One of the responses we received was from Brian Snowdon, Learning and Development Manager at Insight Investment, who gave us a really fascinating perspective into how even the language used around collaboration can be challenged by diversity. He says:

“Even the title of the article itself threw up a pertinent example of cultural difference – working previously in a pan-European organisation, a corporate value title of “Collaboration” had very different connotations for people in France and Holland, notably in age groups that had a recollection of the 1940s. We chose to use “Working together” instead.”

Our theme for November is Meaningful Work – if you have any interesting examples or experiences on this topic, please contact sarahlouise@hotspotsmovement.com for a chance to appear on our blog or in our newsletter. We’d love to hear from you!

If you haven’t done so yet, sign up to our newsletter for the latest insights into collaboration, engagement, workplace diversity and the Future of Work.

Insights from the New Ways of Working Masterclass

Posted on Updated on

Emma

by Emma Birchall, Head of Research, Future of Work

We started this week with a bang by hosting one of our Future of Work masterclasses on the subject of New Ways of Working. Here are some of the highlights.

The impact of social networks

It’s no surprise that social media was a major discussion point. As Lynda pointed out in her keynote, social media has already had a huge impact – but it isn’t quite as entrenched as other habits. While 70% of companies now use social structures and communities internally, with 90% reporting benefits, email remains dominant and many companies struggle to exploit social media’s collaborative potential. Most businesses are only just realising that online communities are becoming just as important as physical communities and many-to-many communication hold great value for the future. Increasingly, social media is becoming the only way to ensure disparate groups of employees make the connections that will help boost productivity and strengthen teams.

Guest speaker Darren Keegan of Tycoon Systems expanded on this theme by highlighting the value of virtual reality workspaces – and why they shouldn’t be ignored as a tool for enabling geographically diverse teams to collaborate effectively.

Global talent pools and hyperspecialised work

Our speakers also focused on job design and the trend towards complex work. With many of the most talented workers choosing portfolio careers and virtual working becoming embedded in corporate culture, companies are waking up to the fact that they can acquire specialist skills virtually instead of hiring experts full-time. By allowing employers to share the most talented workers rather than competing for them this model offers huge benefits such as enabling businesses to carry out complex projects at a reasonable cost. However, it also poses some unique challenges, including the question of how best to assemble teams when some workers are remote, and how to ensure employees stay motivated. Guest speaker Gary Swart, CEO of oDesk – also a renowned expert on the future of work – provided practical insights into this new way of working by describing how oDesk’s business model helps workers build more meaningful, varied and lucrative careers while at the same time enabling businesses to streamline hiring processes and access high-quality work at the best price.

New ways of managing performance

As job design changes, performance management methods have to be updated accordingly. In a world where teams aren’t necessarily co-located, employees frequently work on many projects with different leaders and peers, performance management is following the same patterns as communication and evolving from a one-to-one model to a many-to-many model.

As with communication, social media would seem to be a great solution to this – platforms like Work.com are already offering such services. The real issue around performance management, however, is behaviour. There is no escaping the fact that remote workers receive lower performance appraisals than co-located team members and that people give feedback based on how well they like someone rather than their skill level. Once again, Gary Swart’s take on this provided a glimpse into the future: freelancers on oDesk are already assessed based on their skills rather than what a manager thinks of them.

Finally, we invited members to think outside the box by looking at ways in which human resources professionals can learn from marketing firms when it comes to observing and influencing behaviour. Jonathan Chippindale of Holition provided unique and fascinating insights into how concepts such as augmented reality and gamification are revolutionising consumer behaviours.